Australia

Dr Paul Bain

Research Fellow, School of Psychology

University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia

Education

  • PhD, University of Melbourne
  • Research Fellow, University of Queensland

Background

Paul Bain is an Australian Research Council Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Queensland. He completed his PhD at the University of Melbourne, focusing on values and why people hold some values as fundamental or "core". His current position involves research into people's perceptions of the future of their society, and how utopian or dystopian images of the future influences behavior in the present.

Research Interests

My research interests include human values and virtues; lay theories and beliefs (e.g., about human nature and how societies develop); the cognitive structure of concepts (especially of social concepts like values and moral rules); psychological essentialism; infrahumanisation (treating people in other groups as less human); cross-cultural psychology; and conceptions of society in the future.

Recent Publications

Bain, P. G., Vaes, J., Kashima, Y., Haslam, N., & Guan, Y. (in press). Folk conceptions of humanness: Beliefs about distinctive and core human characteristics in three countries. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology.

Bain, P. G., Park, J., Kwok, C., & Haslam, N. (2009). Attributing human uniqueness and human nature to cultural groups: Distinct forms of subtle dehumanization. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 12, 789-805.

Kashima, Y., Bain, P., Haslam, N., Peters, K., Laham, S., Whelan, J., et al. (2009). Folk theory of social change. Asian Journal of Social Psychology, 12, 227-246.

Haslam, N., Bain, P. (2007). Humanizing the self. Moderators of the attribution of lesser humanness to others. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 33, 57-68.

Bain, P.G., Kashima, Y., & Haslam, N. (2006). Conceptual beliefs about values: Human nature beliefs predict value importance, value tradeoffs, and responses to value-laden rhetoric. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 91, 351-367. 

 
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